Eileen R. Tabios is a poet working in multiple genres and in-between. She also loves books by writing, reading, publishing, critiquing, romancing and advocating for them. This blog will feature her bibliophilic activities with posts on current book engagements and links to her books and projects related to books.

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

BUSILY BLURBING

I was busy with blurbs since I last posted this list of recent books and wine drunk, to wit:

LEAVING THE SHADOWS BEHIND US by ELMER OMAR BASCOS PIZO
Elmer Omar Bascos Pizo’s “Identity” posits to be one “wiggling in the beak of a maya bird, / … the desperate earthworm / struggling to be free.” It’s an apt metaphor for the Philippines beset by corruption, poverty, hunger, and a “common people / pining for a genuine people-serving government.” Yet the beauty of these poems make them like “the gardenias, ylang-ylang, waling-waling, / sampaguitas, and camellias [with] coveted nectars.” With their unforgettable imagery that can elicit empathy from a wide variety of readers, these powerful poems become like bagoong “smelling like a mouse / rotting in a pool of brackish water” and yet that remains a “favorite dipping sauce.” Dip into these poems for an important read. I’ve been aware of Pizo’s poetry for years, and LEAVING THE SHADOWS BEHIND US is a long-overdue debut: “where blood / drains in its purest state.”


SYNONYM FOR HOME by Michelle Murphy
Quite often, rain camouflages. Rain can blow objects across your vision that may (partially) mask what’s before you, or make you tilt your head to the detriment of direct sight. Then there are the raindrops themselves: to see through them is to look as if through a gauze, a shimmer, a veil…. But there are those who can, to paraphrase the lucid artist Agnes Martin, look between raindrops.  That’s why Michelle Murphy’s poems grieve, because they see beneath desire to  understand the world is not fixed: “you say what you mean to say, still the stories crack then leak.”  It’s perhaps a miracle then that this book also contains so many “flashes of grace when least expected”—so that Home remains ever a possibility, despite and against all odds.


OCEAN PLASTIC by Orchid Tierney
Each iteration ends with a last word: respectively, petromonster stomachs stomachs flesh filters gyres stomachs sympathy sympathy gyres gyres gyres gyres gyres nylon-riots. Which is to say, begin with the petromonster and the inevitable interconnection of all things will give even Buddha a stomach ache. One hopes we will riot against feeding the monster like nylon metaphorically protests against itself strangling the planet. For this poem, while powerful (and moving when chanted out loud), isn’t worth its root source.

Speaking of publications, here's my latest Relished W(h)ines update of recently imbibed books and wines.  As ever, please note that in the Publications section, if you see an asterisk before the title, that means a review copy is available for Galatea Resurrects!  More info on that HERE

PUBLICATIONS
LEAVING THE SHADOWS BEHIND US, poems by Elmer Omar Bascos Pizo (in manuscript; see above blurb)

SYNONYM FOR HOME, poems by Michelle Murphy (in manuscript; see above blurb)

OCEAN PLASTIC, poems by Orchid Tierney (in manuscript; see above blurb)

LISTENING TO RED, visual poetry by Dona Mayoora (fabulous! LinkedInPoetry Recommendations #285)

LETTERS FROM THE UNDERWORLD, poems by Alan Baker (timely and eternal at the same time. Wonderful contemporary lyrics)

TO THE BREAK OF DAWN, poems by Oscar Bermeo (moving and wonderful)

THE HEARKENING EYE, poems by Hildegarde Flanner (poems that stand the test of time; a satisfying read)

WOEMAN, poems by T. De Los Reyes (powerful)

* NOS, poems by Aby Kaupang and Matthew Cooperman

*  QUARTET, poems by C. Violet Eaton

*  XOETEOX, poems by Edwin Torres

* SOMETHING FOR EVERYBODY, poems by Anselm Berrigan

*  FOR HUNGER, poems by Margaret Ronda

*  THE IDENTITY THIEF, poems by Derek Mong

* ALPHABET FOR THE ENTRANTS, poems by Vasilisk Gnedov

* CRUEL FICTION, poems by Wendy Trevino

* GLIMMERGLASS GIRL, poems by Holly Lyn Walrath

* LYCANTHROPY by Petrus Borel, Trans. by Joseph Carter, Olchar E. Lindsann, Raymond E. Andre III and W.J. Robertson

* FLYOVER COUNTRY, poems by Austin Smith

* ON A TRAIN AT NIGHT, poems by Norman Fischer

* THE TRYST OF THETICA ZORG, poems by Daniel Y. Harris

* THE SEAS ARE DOLPHINS’ TEARS, poems by Djelloul Marbrook

* TALES RETOLD, poems by Paula Bonnell

* STET, poems by Dora Malech

* BABY, I DON’T CARE, poems by Chelsey Minnis

*  BLUE BIRDS AND RED HORSES, poems by Inna Kabysh, Trans. by Katherine E. Young

*  HOUSES / STRIPPED, poems by Paola Loreto, Trans. by Lawrence Venuti

DECLIVITIES, poems by Irene Koronas

* FLUNG THRONE, poems by Code-Rose Clevidence

* THE SPIDERS, poems by Jody Gladding

* A**A*A*A, poems by Heidi Lynn Staples

* SWOLE, poems by Jerika Marchan

* WAKE ME WHEN IT’S OVER: SELECTED POEMS OF BILL KUSHNER edited by Peter Bushyeager

* PERMAFROST, poems by Michael Dec

* SOUND RITUALS, poems by Jim Leftwich & billy bob beamer

BEAUTY REFRACTED, poems by Carol Moldaw

FAWNING, poems by Edric Mesmer

UNDERSCORE, poems by K.S. Ernst and Sheila E. Murphy

WAR ZONES, poems by Zvi A. Sesling

UNFRAGMENTED, poems by Janet C. Mendoza Stickmon

SELECTED POEMS by Merlie M. Alunan

*  ALL WE HAVE IS OUR VOICE, poems by Carole Stone

*  THE SYNDICATE OF WATER & LIGHT, poems by Marc Vincenz

* DISTANCE TRAVELED by Michael Chin (review copy a pdf)

* REASON’S DREAM, poems by Roger Mitchell

* LEFT HAND DHARMA, poems by Belinda Subraman

* FEED ME WEIRD THINGS, poems by Lisa Rogal

* I HAVE NEVER BEEN ABLE TO SING, poems by Alexis Almeida

* PROFANITY POEMS by Olchar E. Lindsann

* DEFINITIONS OF OBSCURITY, poems by Vernon Frazer & Michelle Greenblatt

* ANCHOR WHAT, visual poetry by Vernon Frazer

NAME AMEN, visual poetry by Aditya Bahl

DIKTER PA SVENSKA, poems by Claude Nguyen

REHEARSAL, poems by Irene Willis

OLAS CURSIS, poems by John M. Bennett

TRES TRESSS TRISSS TRIEESSS TRIL TRILSSSS: TRANSMUTATIONS OF CESAR VALLEJO, poems by Jim Leftwich

THISTLES, poems and illustrations by Jack Cassinetto

BAPTISM, MARRIAGE…, introductions by Simon “The Mapah” Ganneau

LANGUAGE DEATH NIGHT OUTSIDE, “poem/novel” by Peter Waterhouse, Translated by Rosmarie Waldrop

LESSER LIGHTS: MORE TALES FROM A HAMPTON’S APPRENTICESHIP, memoir by Sandy McIntosh

THE YELLOW WELL-LKIGHTED BOOKSHOP, memoir by Lewis Buzbee

RECOLLECTION 1081: CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER: VISUAL DISSENT ON MARTIAL RULE, exhibition monograph 2012, with excerpts from the writings of Allice Guillermo

BOOK OF CURSES (Asian American Literary Review) edited by Lawrence-Minh Bui Davis and Gerald Maa

HOW TO SEE, art writings by David Salle

HERIDAS DE LA LENGUA, art monograph by Manuel Ocampo

FEAR OF A KITSCH EXPERIENCE (1989-2017), art monograph by Manuel Ocampo edited by Menene Gras Balaguer

MEL VERA CRUZ 2001-2007, art monograph by Mel Vera Cruz

WHO’S AFRAID OF CONTEMPORARY ART? By Kyung An and Jessica Cerasi

THE NEW FILIPINO KITCHEN: STORIES AND RECIPES FROM AROUND THE GLOBE edited by Jacqueline Chio-Lauri

ARTISTS LIVING WITH ART, interior decoration by Stacey Goergen and Amanda Benchley with photography by Oberto Gili

AT HOME WITH PICTURES, interior decoration by Paige Gilchrist

WE DIDN’T HAVE MUCH, BUT WE SURE HAD PLENTY: STORIES OF RURAL WOMAN, history by Sherry Thomas

SQUEEZED: WHY OUR FAMILIES CAN’T AFFORD AMERICA, journalism by Alissa Quart

THE ITALIAN TEACHER, novel by Tom Rachman

THE GIRL IN THE MOON, novel by Terry Goodkind

INVISIBLE, novel by James Patterson & David Ellis

THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT, novel by Chris Bohjalian

THE DEFENSE, novel by Steve Cavanagh

LIE TO ME, novel by J.T. Ellison

SHATTERED MIRROR, novel by Iris Johannsen

BRING ME BACK, novel by B.A. Paris

AFTER ANNA, novel by Lisa Scottoline


WINES
2015 Domain Druhin Dundee Hills Pinot Noir Oregon
2015 Patz & Hall Pinot Noir Sonoma Coast
2010 Roulot Meursault Luchets
1961 Chateau Ducru Beaucaillou
1990 Chateau Rayas
1989 Chateau d'Yquem
2006 Domaine Jean Francois Ganevat Cotes du Jura Les Vignes de Mon Pere
1997 Dalla Valle Maya
1990 Haut Brion
2010 Morlet La Proportion Doree
2015 Sina Qua Non Entre chien et loup white wine
2015 Oremus Furmit Mandolas
2007 Scarecrow
1996 G. Conterno Monfortino
2003 Peter Jacob Kuhn Oestrich Lenchen Riesling Trockenbeerenauslese
Michel Gonet Champagne Brut
2000 Bruno Giacosa Asili Reserva (Red Label) Barbaresco
2012 Chimney Rock Galaxy
2005 Molly Dooker The Boxer
Tra Vigne house Cabernet
Mumm Napa Valley sparkling wine
Jacqueson et Fils Cuvee Perfection Special Edition Indepandance des Philippines
2010 Altamura Negroamaro
2010 Kenefick Ranch petite sirah Calistoga NV
2014 Seavey Merlot NV
2009 Seavey Caravina cabernet NV
2014 Seavey Caravina NV
2013 Seavey cabernet NV
1994 Dow
2007 Rombauer merlot Carneros
2009 Archaval Ferrer Finca Bella Vista (Argentinian malbec)
Graham’s Special River Quintas Edition “Six Grapes”
2014 Sierra Cantabria Tempranillo Crianza Rioja
2014 Argiolas “Perdera” Sardinia
2000 Krug
1990 Krug
1966 Dom Ruinart Blanc de Blancs
1994 Bonneau du Martray Corton Charlemagne
2002 Chateau d’Yquem “Y”
2001 Domaine Ramonet Batard-Montrachet
2014 Jaboulet La Chapelle Blanc
1994 Chapoutier Ermitage de L’Oree Blanc
2002 Comte Lafon Meursault-Perrieres (oxidized)
1985 Georges Lignier Clos de la Roche
2012 William Fevre Les Clos Chablis
2010 Bonneau du Martray Corton-Charlemagne
2004 Harlan
1986 Chateau Margaux
1986 Chateau d’Yquem
2015 Walter Hansel “Cuvee Alyce” Chardonnay
1999 Judd’s Hill Cabernet Sauvignon (Double Magnum)
1999 Behrens & Hitchcock Cuvee Lola (Double Magnum)
2005 Donnhoff Niederhauser Hermannshohle Riesling Auslese



Sunday, October 14, 2018

MARSH HAWK REVIEW--FALL 2018 ISSUE IS RELEASED!


As its Guest Editor, I'm pleased to release the Fall 2018 issue of The Marsh Hawk Review. Thank you to the poets for sharing their works. Here are the participants to one of the largest (if not largest) issue conducted by the Review:

Mark Young
Irene Willis
Peter Vanderberg
Lynne Thompson
Susan Terris
Eileen R. Tabios
John Simonds
Mara Adamitz Scrupe
Barry Schwabsky
Susan M. Schultz
Janice Lobo Sapigao
E. San Juan, Jr.
Barbara Jane Reyes
Randy Prunty
Paul Pines
Naomi Buck Palagi
Gwynn O’Gara
David O’Connell
Geoffrey O’Brien
Rich Murphy
Michelle Murphy
Daniel Morris
Sandy McIntosh
Tricia McCallum
Agnes Marton
Mary Mackey
Hank Lazer
Amy Grace Lam
Basil King
Burt Kimmelman
Sherry Kearns
George Kalamaras
Jacqueline Jules
Paul Ilechko
Michael Hardin
Grace Grafton
Anne Gorrick
Kirk Glaser
Robert Gibb
Danny Gallardo
Thomas Fink
Thomas Fink and Maya D. Mason
Carol Dorf
Shira Dentz
Aileen I. Cassinetto
Tom Beckett
Ryan Bayless
Ivy Alvarez




Saturday, October 13, 2018

MODPO CITES HAY(NA)KU!


Al Filreis is the Kelly Professor of English, Director of the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing, and Faculty Director at Kelly Writers House / University of Pennsylvania. He’s also crafted a fabulous  ModPo – Modern & Contemporary American Poetry – series you can follow on YouTube. You can tell Al Filreis must be a great teacher by the extemporaneous flow of his insights as he discusses poetry with others.  The ModPo Live Webcasts are great to watch—I so appreciate how its participants take poetry … seriously. Last but not least, I do appreciate his citation of the hay(na)ku -- about 22 minutes into THIS VIDEO per
“Eileen Tabios’ edition – 15th year anniversary edition of these remarkable hay(na)kus that she’s been promoting. I think Eileen Tabios is doing kinda her version of ModPo by assembling communities of people who are writing in an accessible form, and this is a great thing.”

Btw, I chuckled over his pronunciation of “hay(na)ku”—he says “hay” as in what we toss at the horses to eat. I’ve always thought it as “hai” as in haiku. But you know what I’ve always intended about the hay(na)ku—variations are welcome and all are acceptable.

Salamat
Al Filreis
For your vision.




Thursday, October 11, 2018

LENY STROBEL JOURNALS WITH MDR FOR A HUNDRED PAGES!


How amazing is it to get a 100-page response to one of your books!?!

Yes. Massively amazing.

Leny M. Strobel wrote one-page responses to lines from the MDR Poetry Generator database—see HERE more information about MDR—for a few months and doesn’t disappoint: she goes as varied as MDR does!

And now some excerpts from Leny’s Journaling with MDR Poetry is up at #allpinayeverything curated by Barbara Jane Reyes. Thanks to Leny and Barbara!

Here’s an example of how Leny engaged: to my MDR line

841    I forgot darkness was the key, not the lock.

Leny begins by recalling the “childhood trauma of sexual abuse” and goes from the personal to the political to conclude

The fear of Dark as Other … is also named

Woman
Filipina
Brown Monkey
Sevant of Globalization
Prostitute
Comfort Woman
Imeldific

What power, what energy, lies within Leny. I’m glad she is now an Elder. Salamat, Leny.

Four excerpts of Leny's engagement are available HERE. YOU ARE INVITED TO READ. And perhaps you want to use MDR, too, to spark off new writings ... which you can do through the book MURDER DEATH RESURRECTION. Have fun! Have power!