Eileen R. Tabios is a poet working in multiple genres and in-between. She also loves books by writing, reading, publishing, critiquing, romancing and advocating for them. This blog will feature her bibliophilic activities with posts on current book engagements and links to her books and projects related to books.

Friday, March 24, 2017

THE MARSH HAWK REVIEW, SPRING 2017

I'm delighted to share that two poems from my manuscript HIRAETH, "The Petal Hidden From View" and "Memory's Gauze," are in the Mary Mackey-edited Spring 2017 edition of The Marsh Hawk Review.  Go HERE for the issue and Archive of past issues.  I'm in good company with the Spring issue featuring the following poets:

Corinne Robins
Maxine Hong Kingston
Wil Gibson
Thomas Fink and Maya D. Mason
Susan Terris
Susan Kelly-DeWitt
Steve Fellner
Stephen Paul Miller
Sandy McIntosh
Rusty Morrison
Rochelle Ratner
Robert Gibb
Richard Loranger
Rafael Jesús Gonzalez
Puma Perl
Paul Pines
Patricia Carlin
Michael Rerick
Marge Piercy
Joshua McKinney
Brad Buchanan
Jon Curley
Joan Gelfand
Jane Ormerod
Jane Hirshfield
George Quasha
Daniel Lawless
Eileen Tabios
Dennis Nurkse
Daniel Morris
Basil King



Claudia Carlson

Thursday, March 23, 2017

WINTER ON WALL STREET

This novella-in-verse is my latest Locofo chap from Moria Books. Perhaps the images will encourage you to check it out. Free .pdf read HERE and print order info HERE.





Thanks to Aileen Cassinetto for fabulous book design, Valerie Morton for back cover text, and as ever William Allegrezza for publishing this fabulous Locofo series.



Tuesday, March 21, 2017

"BIG CITY CANTE INTERMEDIO"



Deeply grateful to Tea & Tattered Pages and its curator Amanda Ngoho Reavey for presenting my poem and urban meditation on several cities, "Big City Cante Intermedio," as a Panthalassa Pamphlet.  You can see the ten-page pamphlet poem HERE. Cities covered are New York City, Provence, Ukiah, Baguio City, Barcelona, Vienna and Paris. Here's an excerpt:


I digressed to show how in New York
City (pop.: 8.4 million, est. 2013)
one can be anyone one wants to be

or try,
as in to discover if a fit improbably
exists so that, once, I was a flamenco dancer

in this big city where many effects are
possible
especially with money, e.g.
dance fees which made a dancer
and guitarist hood their eyes at my
version of braceo: the bastardization
of flowers, the opposite of grace—


(how many ways may an artist suffer?)

*

Deep thanks as well to John Bloomberg-Rissman for his deep friendship, which is why I dedicated this poem to him. (His editing suggestions were also very helpful!)

*

"Big City Cante Intermedio" is one of the poems in a developing manuscript entitled URBAN.

Thank you, Universe.


Saturday, March 18, 2017

FANTASTIC CARYATIDS AND MORE!


Wow. What a fabulous conversation between Anne Waldman and Vincent Katz in Fantastic Caryatids (BlazeVOX Books, 2016). If you had been with them, you’d want to pick up lunch for the sheer pleasure of their words and insights. And that's such a wonderful book cover, too!

Speaking of publications, here's my latest Relished W(h)ines update of recently imbibed books and wines.  As ever, please note that in the Publications section, if you see an asterisk before the title, that means a review copy is available for Galatea Resurrects!  More info on that HERE


PUBLICATIONS
THE MARKET WONDERS, poems by Susan Briante (I love her series of money and poetry! LinkedIn Poetry Recommendation (LPR #263)

BROOKLYN ANTEDILUVIAN, poems by Patrick Rosal (fabulous heart, fabulous energy, fabulous rhythms. LPR #262)

THE SEER by Márton Koppány (most assuredly one of the most enchanting books to come out in 2017. LPR #264)

SHORT TALKS by Anne Carson (inspirational, and inspires idea for new collection entitled BRIEFLY … Hm)

FIFTEEN SECONDS WITHOUT SORROW, poems by Shim Bo-Seon, Trans. by Chung Eun-Gwi and Brother Anthony of Taize (glad to be introduced to this poet!)

TIM ATKINS PETRARCH, poems by Tim Atkins (I read the 2011 edition from Barque Press and it is fabulous music exemplifying epigraphed Aragon’s “love [as] a state of confusion between the real and the marvelous.”)

A FEW GEOGRAPHIES, “one-sentence poems” by Mark Young (fabulous, witty and a delight!)

FANTASTIC CARYATIDS: A CONVERSATION WITH ART by Anne Waldman & Vincent Katz (excellent conversationalists!)

ANIMALS OF DAWN, poems by Murat Nemet-Nejat (new dreams surface from intertextual minglings)

FLOWERING MALL, poems by Brandon Brown (brilliant and satisfying)

A TRELLIS POISED MID-SNOW, poems by Sheila E. Murphy (lovely enchantments)

OTREDAD / OTHERNESS, poems by Claribel Alegria, Ed. Fred Whitehead (as ever, …)

HOODLUM BIRDS, poems by Eugene Gloria

UR-LYEH / AKLOPOLIOS, poems by Paolo Javier with artwork/design by Rob Carmichael and Listening Center (David Mason) & Fel Santos

YET, poems by Carrie Etter

*  ABYSS, poems by Ya Hsien, Trans. by John Balcom

*  ONE DAUGHTER IS WORTH TEN SONS, poems by Jiwon Choi

WITHOUT AN ALPHABET, WITHOUT A FACE, poems by Saadi Youssef, Trans. by Khaled Mattawa

*  OVERYELLOW: THE POEM AS INSTALLATION ART by Nicolas Pesques, Trans. by Cole Swensen

*   PILGRIMAGE SUITES, poems by Derek Gromadzki

*  THIS HISTORY THAT JUST HAPPENED, poems by Hannah Craig

*  GO ON, poems by Ethel Rackin

*  THEY WHO SAW THE DEEP, poems by Geraldine Monk

*  IN ONE FORM, poems by Jane Lewity

*  DAUGHTERRARIUM, poems by Sheila McMullin

*  MILKSOP CODICIL, poems by Spree McDonald

*  AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MY GENDER, poems by j/j hastain

*  OBJECTS FROM A BORROWED CONFESSION by Julie Carr

*  THE DEMOTION OF PLUTO: POEMS AND PLAYS by Deborah Meadows

*  TRANSLATION, THE BASS ACCOMPANIMENT: SELECTED POEMS by Deborah Meadows

*  BEASTS, RIVER, DRUNK MEN, GARDEN, BURST, & LIGHT: SEQUENCES AND LONG POEMS by Richard Hague

*  WE SHOULD HAVE SEEN THIS COMING, poems by Martha Deed

*  18 OF 555, poems by John Lowther

* HOW TO ZING THE GOVERNMENT, poems by Travis Macdonald

*  DHAKA POEMS by Kristian Carlsson

*  BONE OF MY BONE, poems by Nicole Rollender

*  CUTTING EYES FROM GHOSTS, poems by Ariana D. Den Bleyker

*  YET ANOTHER BLUNTED ASCENT, poems by Matt Hill

*  INTERVAL: POEMS BASED ON BACH’S “GOLDBERG VARIATIONS” by Alice B. Fogel

*  PETTY POETRY FOR SCROTUS’ GIRLS, WITH POEMS FOR ELIZABETH WARREN AND  MICHELLE OBAMA by Melinda Luisa de Jesus

*  POST-TRUTH BLUES, poems by Colin Dardis

*  IN THESE DAYS OF RAGE, poem by John Bloomberg-Rissman

*  KNOW BETTER: POEMS OF RESISTANCE by Patricia Roth Schwartz

*  ORANGE CRUST & LIGHT, poems by Ronald Mars Lintz

*  EXPLANATION MODEL FOR ‘VIRUS’, poems by Freke Raiha

*  THE ART OF SALAMAT, poems by Aileen Cassinetto

*  B & O BLUES, poems by Aileen Cassinetto

*  POLITICAL APNEA, poems by Leah Mueller

*  THE VEIL DROPS, poems by Mark Young

*  IMAGINE RENAISSANCE, poems by Naomi Buck Palagi

*  STUBBORN, poems by Sheri Reda

*  SWAMP TALES, poems by Dan Ryan

*  A FORCE WITH NO NAME: CHAINED HAY(NA)KU, poems by Aileen Ibardaloza, Paul Cassinetto, and Wesley St. Jo with artwork by Herand Abordo

*  LIBERAL ELITE MEDIA RAG. SAD! , poems by Nicholas Michael Ravnikar

* CHICA/MUJER, poetry by Christine Stoddard

*  DEFYING TRUMPLANDIA: MORE PETTY PEMINIST POETRY by Melinda Luisa de Jesus

*  THE WAITSTAFF OF MAR-A-LARGO, poems by Mark Young

*  STOP ARMAGEDDON, poems and visual poetry by Howard Yosha

*  EXTREME VETTING, poems by Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt

*  BREAKFAST AT THE END OF CAPITALISM, poems by Michael Dickel

*  POEMS OF INNOCENCE AND GUILT by Tom Hibbard

*  THE MARRIAGE OF HEAVEN AND HELL: AN ELECTION CYCLE by Andrew and Donora A. Rihn

*  SOME YEARS ASK, poems by Carol Dorf

NO RESPECT: NEW & SELECTED POEMS 1964-2000 by Gerard Malanga

POWER BALLADS, poems by Garrett Caples

SHORT TALKS, poems plus by Anne Carson

I LOVE IT THOUGH, poems by Alli Warren

THE LATEST WINTER, poems by Maggie Nelson

WIDENING INCOME INEQUALITY, poems by Frederick Seidel

NINE DRAGON ISLAND, poems by Eleanor Goodman

*  YEAR OF THE BUTTERFLY, poems by Gary Gautier

*  TWEET, poems by Aileen Cassinetto

*  DEFYING TRUMPLANDIA: PITHY PEMINIST POETRY by Melinda Luisa De Jesus

102 POEMS by Dan Waber (in manuscript)

ANO BA: VOICES FROM THE PILIPINX DIASPORA, Winter 2017, literary journal edited by Brian Braganza and Philip De Guzman with art director Ligaya Romero

KARTIKA REVIEW, Issue 16, Fall 2013, literary & arts journal, Managing Editor Sunny Woan

WHAT IS POETRY? (JUST KIDDING, I KNOW YOU KNOW): Interviews From the Poetry Project Newsletter (1983-2009) edited by Anselm Berrigan

ANTHOLOGY OF SCOTTISH POETS, co-edited by Neil Leadbeater and Sally Evans

*  NEVERTHELESS, #SHE PERSISTED, poetry anthology edited by Barbara Jane Reyes

RESIST MUCH / OBEY LITTLE: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance edited by Michael Boughn, John Bradley, Brenda Cárdenas, Lynne DeSilva-Johnson, Kass Fleisher, Roberto Harrison, Kent Johnson, Andrew Levy, Nathaniel Mackey, Rubén Medina, Philip Metres, Nita Noveno, Julie Patton, Margaret Randall, Michael Rothenberg, Chris Stroffolino,
Anne Waldman, Marjorie Welish, Tyrone Williams

*  PUNETA: POLITICAL PILIPINX POETRY, Vol. 2, edited by Barbara Jane Reyes

*  PUNETA: POLITICAL PILIPINX POETRY, Vol. 3, edited by Luisa A. Igloria

*  MENOPAUSAL HAY(NA)KU FOR P-GRUBBERS, edited by Eileen R. Tabios

FILIPINO AMERICAN ARTIST DIRECTORY, curated by Janna Anonuevo Langholz

CONFESSIONS OF A VOLCANO, novel by Eric Gamalinda

THE MUSIC CHILD & THE MAHJONG QUEEN, novel by Alfred A. Yuson

THE LAST MISTRESS OF JOSE RIZAL, short stories by Brian Ascalon Roley

PROVENCE: ART DE VIVRE ET ARTISANAT by Amelia Saint George


WINES
2002 Bonneau du Martray Corton Charlemagne
2013 Marc Colin Chassagne Montrachet Les Caillerts
1990 Guigal Hermitage
1995 Togni cabernet NV
2015 Domaine Huet Le Mont Moelleux Vouvray
2012 Bruno Giacosa Nebbiolo Barbera d'Alba
2003 Chateau Montrose (Achilles’ birth year)
2007 Shafer Hillside Select
2012 Kent Price Pulse cabernet
2013 Rapp Ranch cabernet
Charles Ninot Cremient de Burgogne
2014 Ravenswood zinfandel
2001 La Rioja Alta Vina Ardanza Reserva Especial




Friday, March 17, 2017

TWO NEW POEMS

mark my first appearance in UNLIKELY STORIES:

"Robot Cosplay"
and
"Letter From Sarayaku"

Thanks to editor Jonathan Penton. These poems reflect my renewed interest in plain-speaking (plain by my standards) and stand-alone (vs. series-based) poems, and can be seen HERE.


A DIFFERENT TYPE OF HAY(NA)KU FOR THE TIMES...

That title says it all--my newest edited anthology:


Thanks to the participating poets: Sheila Bare, Melinda Luisa de Jesus, Glynda Velasco, John Bloomberg-Rissman, Aileen & Paul Cassinetto, Dan Waber, Jean Vengua and Moi. Also, I am grateful for Malaya's appearance on the anthology's back cover. As my friend John puts it, she's like the prequel to the front cover :)


So thanks to poet-publisher William Allegrezza for this is part of Moria Books' Locofo Chap series--you can see a free. pdf read HERE.  A print version is available for a mere $5 over HERE.


Wednesday, March 15, 2017

POLITICAL PILIPINX POETRY IN (AT LEAST) THREE VOLUMES!

I'm delighted that my anthology PUNETA: POLITICAL PILIPINX POETRY  became a series to total three anthologies through Moria Books' Locofo Chap series! You can have free .pdf reads HERE. Link also has order information for print copies -- owning all three would be good for a historic set!




Thanks again to Jenny Ortuoste for the embroidered word, and Barbara for the idea of the series!



Tuesday, March 14, 2017

GALATEA RESURRECTS IS FRESH!

Five more reviews just got posted at Galatea Resurrects which is now posting reviews as they are received, instead of being issue-based. So far, the change in format seems to be resulting in more reviews which is great. My thanks to the volunteer-reviewers!  Here are March's contents thus far:


MARCH

Moria Books' locofo chap series edited by William Allegrezza
Engaged by Eileen R. Tabios 3/14)
Reviewed by Jim McCrary (3/13)

THE OLFACTIONS: Poems on Perfume by Anne Gorrick
Engaged by Eileen R. Tabios (3/12)

Ice Cream...With a Smile by Swapan Ray
Engaged by Runa Bandyopadhyay (3/11)

WHAT IS POETRY? (JUST KIDDING, I KNOW YOU KNOW): Interviews From the Poetry Project Newsletters (1983-2009) edited by Anselm Berrigan Engaged by Eileen R. Tabios (3/10) 

Nevertheless, #She Persisted edited by Barbara Jane Reyes and RESIST MUCH / OBEY LITTLE: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance edited by Michael Boughn, John Bradley, Brenda Cárdenas, Lynne DeSilva-Johnson, Kass Fleisher, Roberto Harrison, Kent Johnson, Andrew Levy, Nathaniel Mackey, Rubén Medina, Philip Metres, Nita Noveno, Julie Patton, Margaret Randall, Michael Rothenberg, Chris Stroffolino, 
Anne Waldman, Marjorie Welish, Tyrone Williams
Engaged by Eileen Tabios (3/5)

Men, Death, Lies by Roy Bentley
Reviewed by Martha Deed (3/4)

FEATURE ESSAY: "Holiness and Jewish Rebellion: 'Questions of Accent,' Twenty Years Afterwards" by Murat Nemet-Nejat (3/4) 

THE SEER by Márton Ko
ppány
Engaged by Eileen Tabios (3/3)

Don't Say His Name by Donna Kuhn
Reviewed by Mary Kasimor (3/2)

Pier by Janine Oshiro
Reviewed by Neal Leadbeater (3/1)



*

To remind, Galatea Resurrects is always looking for reviewers. You can review your own copies of poetry publications or see and request from a list of available review copies over HERE.






Friday, March 10, 2017

COMPREHENDING MORTALITY


Achilles has inspired poetry more than once. My go-to collaborator John Bloomberg-Rissman and I created one for Locofo Chaps entitled COMPREHENDING MORTALITY. As John says, "I'm glad there is something out in the world for Achilles now. Perhaps in another few thousand years people will read the Iliad and think that the mighty warrior who killed Hektor was a dog." Thanks as ever to Bill Allegrezza for a brilliant idea of a protest series. Hope you check it out at http://www.moriapoetry.com/locofo.html (a free .pdf read is available).

That cover image of the Owl tinkering with the Frog reminds me of my cats using their sharp claws to just, you know, tinker with the insects unfortunate enough to slip into the house ... Mortality indeed.


Tuesday, March 7, 2017

INTERVIEW AT WATERMELON ISOTOPE


Kenneth Butler interviews me at WATERMELON ISOTOPE -- what a fantastic name, yes?  You can see interview HERE. Here's an (unexpected) excerpt:
KPG. Do you have a connection to the American Civil War? Relative who served? Visited a battlefield and have a story? 
ERT. When we were dropping off my son for his freshman year at IUP in Pennsylvania, we stopped on the way there to visit Gettysburg. And I was most struck by the State of Louisiana monument created by Donald DeLue. Entitled “Spirit Triumphant,” it presents a wounded gunner while above him flies a “Spirit” sounding a trumpet and raising a flaming cannonball. While the title discernibly relates to the majestic Spirit, I my attention remained snagged on the body of the fallen gunner, specifically how his toes were visible as they’d broken through what was a pair of too-small shoes. And I’d also just learned that many soldiers on both sides of the Civil War were younger than the son I was bringing to his college. I considered my son to be so “young” and my  heart just broke, looking at the fallen gunner who might have been younger than my son but who had to fight a war in ill-fitting boots.

The interview is accompanied by three poems from my next book HIRAETH--"Kohl's Stories," "Notes to the Spanish Guitar's Autobiography," and "Where the Pages End." Poems are HERE.


Saturday, March 4, 2017

IMMIGRANT: HAY(NA)KU & OTHER POEMS IN A NEW LAND


I'm grateful for William Allegrezza's Locofo Chap Series for publishing my latest chapbook. Its impetus was recent anti-immigrant activities in the country. But it also picked up on my ongoing attempts to disrupt/expand the form of (auto)biography. The front cover presents me as a toddler in black-and-white ensconced (w/ no irony at the time by my Mama) in a colonial frame complete with U.S.-American counterpart. The books are apt as I'm a writer--well, writing well is the best revenge and the back cover shows me reading at the United States Library of Congress. So there's a lot to unpack in my new chap; I hope you check it out.

Scroll down for free .pdf read at http://www.moriapoetry.com/locofo.html



Wednesday, March 1, 2017

ACHILLES, R.I.P.


Interrupting our regular programming to share the update on Achilles, my dog who so inspired me that he even entered my poetry. After over 13 years with our family, Achilles moved on after being afflicted by cancer. After receiving the cancer diagnosis, I thought to celebrate his life on Facebook as several Friends there know of Achilles. I didn't expect the Facebook diary to be so short--I replicate it here for our friends and family:

2/22/17
Was devastated today to receive unexpected cancer diagnosis for Achilles: Visceral Hemangiosarcoma. I'll be posting a photo a day of him -- I want to celebrate his life. He's not in distress yet but we apparently don't have much time. He's here in one of my favorite photos -- with Dad who I know will be waiting for him. They share a lot of traits together, including silence and strength:


2/23/17
Nearly 13 years ago, we welcomed a 6-month-old Gabriela (right) to keep Achilles (left) in fur company. This was taken during the first day they met. They met, immediately played, and were inseparable companions until Gabriela left us 3 years ago. Flakiness Alert: Gabriela came to me in a dream a couple of days ago and said, "I miss him."



2/24/17
Achilles came to us at about 9 weeks old. Before he arrived, we had adopted two young cats including Artemis. We met Artemis shortly after she'd been dropped off at the local shelter with a litter of kittens. She'd been separated from her babies by the time we met. When Achilles came bounding into the house, it was evident that he was still a baby and, patiently, she was able to develop a relationship with our puppy. Artemis has a strong maternal instinct and I'd always imagined that she, just over a year old at the time, must have missed her babies. She became Achilles' Mom and they grew up trusting each other. The first photo (dining room) shows them shortly after they met; I remember holding my breath as I didn't know if the puppy had enough self-control to calmly sit next to her. He did, and they came to love hanging out. She loves sleeping next to him; when he was older and bigger, I'd occasionally catch her napping next to him with her tiny head pillowed on his large ear. The inner part of Achilles' ear is silky-soft--I'd want to nap on it too...




2/25/17
Achilles is ever the charmer. He is never the wallflower at parties.



2/26/17
Achilles has always loved water.When he was a puppy, I got him a kiddie pool. He loves it when others share his love for water, hence he shared his kiddie pool with other human children. More recently, he tried to persuade Athena about the fun benefits of a swimming pool. He (& Michael) didn't manage to entice her last summer, even after bringing a ball into the water. So he shrugged (in his wisdom, he knew better than to force Athena to do anything), and went back to enjoying his swim. May Achilles always have access to water ... and any other blessings he desires. For he deserves them all.


(Achilles, the excellent swimmer)

Michael: Athena, c'mon in!
Athena: I'll stay here...


2/27/17 Morning
Dogs, of course, are a source of comfort to kids. This was Michael's first Christmas with us and Achilles (right) and our since-departed Gabriela (left) helped him feel at home.




2/27/17 Evening
Not a good day for Achilles. When I went to rub his ears, I noticed he was warm. Rushed him to vet to check his temperature--and nearly smashed my dog walker's van as I hurriedly backed out of garage. He was running a fever and we got the appropriate meds. I suppose today is the start now of a series of bad days (cancer sucks). He's worth all the effort--I have never met a kinder creature than Achilles. I think you can see his kindness in this old photo, when he was all ears for a little boy who wanted someone to listen:



2/28/17 Morning
Centerfold material. Achilles (left) and Gabriela (right) appeared in two winery pet calendars. Here are the photos that got them in. (They might have gotten the calendar cover, but the winery owner had their own pets... )




2/28/17 Afternoon
As someone who's stopped traffic catching a frisbee across the length of a football field, Achilles is a superb athlete. And since welcoming Michael to the mountain with a game of soccer, he's relished following Michael's forays into sports, from baseball to basketball to track.









2/28/17 Evening

MAMA'S ACHILLES HAY(NA)KU

My
son. My
dog. My son.





3/1/17 Morning
Ajax and Athena staying near Achilles. Ajax brings him balls.





3/1/17 Afternoon
It happened so quickly. Life expires so fast. Not even a week after receiving Achilles’ cancer diagnosis, he transitioned on. Early this morning, he collapsed. I rushed him to the animal hospital where Tom, in San Francisco overnight, rushed to meet me. The cancer had spread, and the emergency room doctor—bolstered by two specialists when they realized we wouldn’t easily let go—suggested Achilles should move on. We debated for about an hour before deciding the doctors were right. We moved into a lovely room for saying our Farewell. We wanted a last chance to spend time with Achilles. While doing so, Achilles just seemed sufficiently sprightly for Tom to keep second-guessing our decision. Then his phone rang. Unexpectedly, it was Mollie who was Achilles’ favorite dog walker. Tom told her the news. She begged us to wait for her before letting Achilles go. We agreed. Realizing we had to wait at least an hour for Mollie to get to the hospital, Tom went to a nearby deli to get Achilles some steak. Achilles had been on a single-protein (in his case, trout) diet for years. Boy oh boy was he DELIGHTED to see that steak. He perked right up out of his lethargy and inhaled nearly all of the meat until I saved some for Mollie to give him. Then Mollie arrived. Oh he perked up again and they cuddled and joked around for a time. Then, Achilles looked around, and for the first time that day laid down on his side. He laid his glorious head on my right palm shielding him against the floor. That’s when we knew he was telling us he was ready to meet his sister Gabriela. It was the perfect way to shed mortality’s coils.

Later, Mollie would tell us, she had been walking at a local vineyard and felt Achilles’ presence, which was when she called Tom. When I asked where she was walking, it was at the same vineyard—same pathways—where we’d taken Achilles for his last vineyard walk this weekend. Achilles had been the last surviving dog from Mollie’s dog-walking business; when she entered the hospital room where we waited, guess what she discovered? Along one wall hangs a poster that had been her business’ logo. As for the doctor who ended up helping Achilles transition? It was a doctor who used to be at a different institution and, there, had saved Achilles’ life as a puppy 12 years ago. The circle turns, and turns...

Achilles and Gabriela were the mountain’s first two German Shepherds. There’s a path on the mountain that goes up and when it levels, that’s where I imagine the Rainbow Bridge awaits. Here he is on that path with his sister Gabriela when both were at the peak of their physical powers. The mountain’s next two German Shepherds, Athena and Ajax, also have walked on that path and, with this photo, I imagine the puppies seeing off Achilles and promising, “It’s our turn: we’ll take care of the family you love.”


We were blessed with Achilles when he was 9 weeks old. He leaves us nearly 13.5 years old. I am so grateful Achilles lived well, and transitioned well. Through my grief, and as I noticed when I left the hospital, I share: "My dear friends and family, it’s a beautiful —absolutely glorious —day."

Gabriela and Achilles

Athena and Ajax



************************

P.S. 
Beyond the rainbow bridge, Achilles and Gabriela frolic, forever healthy and forever amidst vineyards in flower: